Ansible: Installing Ansible on Ubuntu 16.04

Ansible is an agentless configuration management tool that helps operations teams manage installation, patching, and command execution across a set of servers.

In this article I’ll describe how to deploy the latest release of Ansible using pip on Ubuntu 16.04, and then perform a quick validation against a client.

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Ansible: Managing a Windows host using Ansible

Ansible is an agentless configuration management tool that helps operations teams manage installation, patching, and command execution across a set of servers.

Ansible was started as a Linux only solution, leveraging ssh to provide a management channel to a target server.  However, starting at Ansible 1.7, support for Windows hosts was added by using Powershell remoting over WinRM.

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Ansible: Installing Ansible on Ubuntu 14.04

Ansible is an agentless configuration management tool that helps operations teams manage installation, patching, and command execution across a set of servers.

In this article I’ll describe how to deploy the latest release of Ansible using pip on Ubuntu 14.04, and then perform a quick validation against a client.

Continue reading “Ansible: Installing Ansible on Ubuntu 14.04”

GoLang: Vendor directory for github branches other than master

Using 3rd party packages from github is made very simple in the Go language with the import statement.  But one problem is that “go get” will always pull the HEAD of the master branch and there is no way to explicitly specify another branch.

The ultimate answer would be to use a package dependency manager like Glide, which I describe in this article.  But if you cannot introduce Glide into your workflow yet then manually populating the vendor directory (enabled by default since 1.6) is a viable alternative.

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EMC OnDemand: Federated Identity Management and Silent SSO

Identity Management for On-Premise Applications

Our industry today has some very proven technologies for providing a single set of login credentials to applications installed on-premise.  Most commonly, companies use a central Identity Management system (e.g. Microsoft Active Directory/Oracle Internet Directory/IBM Tivoli), and these systems implement an LDAP interface that 3rd party applications can call to validate user credentials.

This allows end users to login to their internal HR portal, SharePoint site, or local Documentum Webtop with the same credentials they used to gain entrance into their Windows Desktop, and is termed SSO (Single Sign-On).  This has dramatically improved the end user experience, as well as improved the ability of IT to mange the risk and policies surrounding identity management.

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