Ubuntu: Silent package installation and debconf

If you have worked on deploying packages via apt-get, you are probably familiar with a couple of forms of interruption during the package installation and upgrade process.

The first is the text menu shown during package upgrades that informs you that a new configuration file is available and asks if you want to keep your current one, use the new one from the package maintainer, or show the difference.

The second is the occasional ASCII dialog that interrupts the install/upgrade and ask for essential information before moving forward.  The screenshot below is the dialog you get when installing MySQL or MariaDB, asking to set the initial root password for the database.

The problem, in this age of cloud scale, is that you often need completely silent installations and upgrades that can be pushed out via Configuration Management.  Even if this is a build for an immutable image, you would prefer a completely automated construction process instead of manual intervention each time you build an image.

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AppDynamics: Silent Install of Controller on Ubuntu and license directory

appdynamics_logo_gray_rgb-170924For full instructions on installing the AppDynamics Controller on Linux, see the official documentation.  However, when you get to the step for installing in silent mode, it can be confusing because although it shows you how to specify the path to a response file and the keys available, it does not give you a sample file.

./controller_64bit_linux.sh -q -c -varfile /home/user/response.varfile

One way to generate a sample file that matches the responses you want in production is to manually install the controller in a development environment first. If you run the installer:

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EMC OnDemand: Federated Identity Management and Silent SSO

Identity Management for On-Premise Applications

Our industry today has some very proven technologies for providing a single set of login credentials to applications installed on-premise.  Most commonly, companies use a central Identity Management system (e.g. Microsoft Active Directory/Oracle Internet Directory/IBM Tivoli), and these systems implement an LDAP interface that 3rd party applications can call to validate user credentials.

This allows end users to login to their internal HR portal, SharePoint site, or local Documentum Webtop with the same credentials they used to gain entrance into their Windows Desktop, and is termed SSO (Single Sign-On).  This has dramatically improved the end user experience, as well as improved the ability of IT to mange the risk and policies surrounding identity management.

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